public holidays

Articles

Empire Day

  • Page 1 – Empire Day

    Now almost forgotten, Empire Day was marked with parades, flag salutes and stirring speeches. Established in 1903, the day commemorated the long reign of Queen Victoria.

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  • Page 1 - Empire DayEmpire Day (24 May), was celebrated widely in New Zealand from 1903 and was a major event in the Vice-regal

Waitangi Day

  • Page 1 – Waitangi Day

    Every year on 6 February, New Zealand marks the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840. For most people, Waitangi Day is a holiday; for many, and especially for Māori, it is

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  • Page 4 – Waitangi Day 1960s

    The Waitangi Day Act 1960 declared 6 February to be Waitangi Day; a national day of thanksgiving in commemoration of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi.

  • Page 5 – Waitangi Day 1970s

    Waitangi Day, a public holiday from 1974, briefly became New Zealand Day in the 1970s. Increasingly, it became a focus for Māori protest activities.

  • Page 6 – Waitangi Day 1980s

    The 1980s brought changes in the way Waitangi Day was marked officially, as well as growing Māori protest.

  • Page 7 – Waitangi Day 1990s

    In the 1990s Waitangi Day events became a focus for protests about sovereignty.

  • Page 8 – Waitangi Day in the 21st century

    Waitangi Day in the 21st century has been linked more closely with New Zealand identity, and events have expanded beyond Waitangi itself. Protests have continued, and

Anzac Day

  • Page 1 – Anzac Day

    First observed in 1916, Anzac Day - 25 April - commemorates those killed in war as well as honouring returned servicemen and women. The ceremonies that are held at war

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  • Page 3 – The Anzacs

    The word Anzac is part of the culture of New Zealanders and Australians. The word conjures up a shared heritage of two nations, but it also has a specific meaning, dating from

  • Page 2 – The ceremony

    The Anzac Day ceremony of 25 April is a form of military funeral and follows a particular pattern. The day's ceremonies have two major parts: one at dawn and another, more

  • Page 4 – The making of Anzac Day

    Anzac Day was made a half-day holiday in 1916, and the pattern of the day's events that occur now began at that time.

  • Page 5 – A sacred holiday

    Anzac Day became a public holiday and took on new meaning in a time of peace. It became a time to express sorrow, not glorify war, and was a sacred day that had a secular tone

  • Page 6 – Another war and peace

    Anzac Day came to have a wider focus and the commemorations became more popular in the years after the Second World War.

  • Page 7 – Modern Anzac Day

    Each generation of New Zealanders redefines Anzac Day to suit the mood of the times, but the last 40 years have been a time of much redefinition.

  • Page 9 – The red poppy

    The red poppy has become a symbol of war remembrance the world over. In many countries it  is worn around Armistice Day (11 November), but in New Zealand it is most

Dominion status

Labour Day

  • Page 1 – Labour Day

    Celebrated on the fourth Monday in October, Labour Day commemorates the struggle for an eight-hour working day, a right that carpenter Samuel Parnell had famously fought for in

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  • Page 1 - Labour DayCelebrated on the fourth Monday in October, Labour Day commemorates the struggle for an eight-hour working day, a right that carpenter Samuel Parnell had famously fought for in

Christmas in New Zealand

  • Page 1 – Kiwi Christmas

    Christmas in New Zealand is less about snow and sleigh bells and more about sun, sand and backyard barbecues. Over the holiday season we explore the Kiwi Christmas experience

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  • Page 1 - Kiwi ChristmasChristmas in New Zealand is less about snow and sleigh bells and more about sun, sand and backyard barbecues. Over the holiday season we explore the Kiwi Christmas experience –