Pages tagged with: liberal party

McKenzie's early memory of evicted crofters shaped his whole life's philosophy and his land-reform work in the Liberal government of the 1890s.
Portrait of John McKenzie, circa 1889
The government's compulsory arbitration process meant New Zealand experienced no strikes between 1894 and 1908.
In the period between the first European landings and the First World War, New Zealand was transformed from an exclusively Māori world into one in which Pākehā dominated numerically, politically, socially and economically.
The series of labour acts for which William Pember Reeves was responsible gave New Zealand the most extensive system of labour regulations in the world at the turn of the twentieth century.
The series of labour acts for which William Pember Reeves was responsible gave New Zealand the most extensive system of labour regulations in the world at the turn of the twentieth century.
Video about the breaking up of Cheviot Hills estate in 1893
Photograph of Richard Seddon's (1893-1906) 1906 ministerial cabinet.
The Liberals were already yesterday’s men when they made Thomas Mackenzie Sir Joseph Ward’s successor after needing the speaker’s casting vote to win a confidence vote.
Sir Joseph Ward, New Zealand’s political Lazarus, led governments nearly a quarter of a century apart.
Although William Hall-Jones merely warmed the seat while Richard Seddon’s designated successor, Sir Joseph Ward, returned from Europe, he was the first leader to enter office as prime minister, not premier.
Dawn of the New Zealand temperance movement, 1881-1893.
The Liberal and Labour Federation is generally considered to have been New Zealand's first organised political party.
Richard Seddon’s nickname, ‘King Dick’, says it all. Our longest-serving and most famous leader not only led the government, he was it, many argued. For 13 years he completely dominated politics.
Celebrated on the fourth Monday in October, Labour Day commemorates the struggle for an eight-hour working day, a right that carpenter Samuel Parnell had famously fought for in 1840. Our first Labour Day was held on 28 October 1890, and it has been a statutory public holiday since 1900.
John Ballance, who led the Liberals to power in 1890, was called ‘the rainmaker’ by voters relieved to see the return of prosperity.
A world first, the Act gave a small means-tested pension to destitute older people who were 'of good moral character'; Chinese were specifically excluded. It was one of the major achievements of Richard Seddon's Liberal government.
Ballance was the first Liberal premier. He laid the foundation for a government that was widely seen as making New Zealand ‘the social laboratory of the world’.
Henry George (Harry) Ell was raised on the family farm at Halswell near Christchurch. From 1881 to 1884 he served at Parihaka as a volunteer in the Armed Constabulary. He  also worked in the printing trade, then as a salesman and surveyor.
Premier Seddon visits the terminal face of Franz Josef Glacier in 1905. Seddon was an avowed imperialist and was anxious to promote New Zealand's beauty and identity to the world.

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