Waikato War map

On 12 July 1863 Lieutenant-General Duncan Cameron’s forces crossed the Mangatāwhiri Stream to invade Waikato.

After his return as governor in 1861, George Grey decided that the Kīngitanga, with its determination not to sell land, presented a serious challenge to colonial authority.

In 1862 and 1863 troops extended the Great South Road from Auckland and built a string of redoubts as a forward base for the invasion. Between July 1863 and April 1864 imperial troops, accompanied by locally raised Pākehā units, advanced as far south as Kihikihi.

Major battles were fought at Rangiriri on the Waikato River and at Ōrākau on the southern edge of the central Waikato district, which was occupied by British troops. Māori from the lower and central Waikato took refuge in lands to the south and east. The conflict also spread into Bay of Plenty in 1864.

The Waikato campaign was the largest and most successful of the British military operations in the colony between 1845 and 1866. Although one of the government’s main aims was achieved the Waikato basin was largely cleared of Māori for European settlement the King movement was not vanquished.

How to cite this page: 'Waikato War map', URL: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/war/new-zealands-19th-century-wars/waikato-war-map, (Ministry for Culture and Heritage), updated 22-Jan-2014

Community contributions


James B
03 Aug 2010
Thanks for this, this helped me out alot with my assignment
Whetu Marama
30 May 2010
Kia Ora. Im apprehensive to mention the following written avoidance of the "LAND CONFISCATIONS in TAURANGA" that resulted in participation of the Pukihinahina-Tauranga support for the Maori/British land wars. I understand my youth may hold some naivety, but does generations of korero hold any facts? Please advise me of any truth beholding "LAND CONFISCATIONS to the Tauranga Moana Regions" participation in the Pukehinahina Battle of this time era? Your Knowledge & resource arena in this area would be helpful in ascertaining any truth for me. Thank You W Marama
admin
03 Sep 2009
Kia ora Brett

Have you seen our features about the King Mvt?

See also the Te Ara entry

For print see: Te Kīngitanga: the people of the Maori King movement. Auckland University Press/Dictionary of New Zealand Biography, 1996.

Hei kona, Jamie Mackay

Brett Taylor (Ngati Tua)
03 Sep 2009
Kia Ora Admin, I have found this map very useful but am possibly needing more resources on the King Movement. I am finding it hard at Wellington Library to find much, Any ideas on where I could look?
admin
20 Aug 2009
Hi Brad - a more detailed version of this map appears in the NZ Historical Atlas (1997)
Brad
17 Aug 2009
Any more advanced versions of this Map? Cheers
admin
03 Apr 2009
Hi History Project Probably not much good to you, but we are planning a major feature on the Waikato War later this year. In the meantime there is quite a bit of information in our King Movement topic. Also there are a couple of Calendar events that have more detail on specific events: British forces invade Waikato and Maori surrender at Rangiriri Other sources can be found on our NZ Wars Further information page (including a link to the Jamie Belich documentary about the NZ Wars on NZOnScreen website.) Hope this helps Jamie Mackay Web editor www.nzhistory.net.nz
history project
02 Apr 2009
can anyone show me any good sites containing info about the moari wars especially in the waikato area
admin
17 Sep 2008
Hi John - this map is based one that originally appeared in the NZ Historical Atlas. Like many of the plates in this publication the map challenges the 'normal' perspective of events, in this case seeing the Waikato as the British forces saw it - a place to be invaded starting from the north. Jamie Mackay
John Rowe
16 Sep 2008
The map is upside down, and the wrong way round

What do you know?